did-you-kno:

We are who we think we are. People diagnosed with dissociative identity disorder display multiple identities, and each one may have very real physical differences, such as allergies, right-or-left handedness, or the need for glasses.Source

did-you-kno:

We are who we think we are. People diagnosed with dissociative identity disorder display multiple identities, and each one may have very real physical differences, such as allergies, right-or-left handedness, or the need for glasses.
Source

did-you-kno:

Your body is like its own planet. There are more microscopic life forms living on you than there are people on Earth. Like, trillions more.  Source

did-you-kno:

Your body is like its own planet. There are more microscopic life forms living on you than there are people on Earth. Like, trillions more. Source

archiemcphee:

Seattle-based artist Carol Milne knits with glass, or rather, she creates wonderful glass sculptures that make it seem as though she’s either a superhuman glass knitter or in possession of enchanted knitting needles and very specialized gloves. The reality is actually much more complicated, but no less awesome. Milne invented her glass knitting technique back in 2006. It’s a process that involves knitting with wax instead of glass, followed by lost-wax casting, mold-making and kiln-casting.

First, a model of the sculpture is made from wax which is then encased by a refractory mold material that can withstand extremely high temperatures. Next, hot steam is used to melt the wax, leaving behind an empty cavity in the shape of the artwork. Pieces of room temperature glass are then placed inside the mold which is then heated to 1,400-1,600 degrees Fahrenheit depending on the type of glass. Afterward, the piece is slowly cooled over a period of several weeks, followed by a careful excavation process, where Milne delicately chips away like an archaeologist to reveal the final piece.

To check out more of Carol Milne’s extraordinary artwork visit the Glass Art SocietyMilne’s Facebook page or her online gallery.

[via Colossal]

bookshelfporn:

Useful Read/Unread Bookshelf 

Love this creative bookshelf designed by the typography and design loving people at Mebrureoral that would definitely encourage me to finish all of my unread books.

(via escapekit)

bookshelfporn:

Framed Bookshelf by Mark Taylor Design

bookshelfporn:

Framed Bookshelf by Mark Taylor Design

haily-rangdai:

itsstuckyinmyhead:

The World’s Only Consulting Fandom 

I have no regrets being in this fandom

Anonymous said: Recommend some really good angst manga. Preferably complete. Thanks

onlygoodyaoi:

Try reading ones below. Hope you’ll like it (。◝‿◜。)

  • Running on Empty (shounen ai)
  • Sora o Daite Oyasumi
  • Golden Days (shounen ai)
  • Mahoroba no Hibi Manga  (shounen ai)
  • Lovers Doll
  • Kyuuso Ha Cheese no Yume Omiru
  • Shiranai Kao
  • Michiru Heya
  • Wild Fangs
  • Boys Next Door
  • Limiter
  • Under Grand Hotel (about the prison underground without escape…really good!)
  • Kobi no Kyoujin (I warn you, it’s hardcore!)
  • Koi to wa Yobenai (sweet and sad…)
  • Scarlet
  • G Sanjou no Neko
  • Cut
  •  Hero Heel
  • Totally Captivated
  • Yellow
  • Doushitemo Furetakunai
  • Akane Shinchi Hanaya Sange
  • Double Mints
  • Ouji to Kotori

aseaofquotes:

Colleen Hoover, Hopeless

aseaofquotes:

Colleen Hoover, Hopeless

(Source: aseaofquotes, via aseaofquotes)

aseaofquotes:

Tara Conklin, The House Girl

aseaofquotes:

Tara Conklin, The House Girl

(via heyscissorman)

  • Me: Okay, it's 5am, so this episode will be the last episode for tonight.
  • Episode: *ends on cliff hanger*
  • Me: *deep, long sigh*
  • Me:
  • Me:
  • Me: Dammit *clicks next episode*

skyscraper:

Dubai fog

nubbsgalore:

photos from dubai’s 828 meter tall burj khalifa (save the first and last photos, which show the building) by (click pic) daniel cheongkarim nafatnibjoern lauen and dave alexander. duabai only experiences this in september and march, when seasonal changes in temperature creates an abundance of early morning fog.

archiemcphee:

Dutch designers Marcia Nolte, Stijn van der Vleuten and Bob Waardenburg work together as We Make Carpets to create, well, carpets. However their carpets are awesomely unusual and definitely not made to be walked on.

The patterns they use are very traditional, but the materials are anything but. The trio uses everyday items such as cocktail umbrellas, bamboo skewers, disposable kitchenware, crayons, fireworks and dried pasta to create intricately patterned carpets that exist as temporary art installations presenting a critical view of consumer culture.

To celebrate 5 years of creative carpet-making We Make Carpets is holding an exhibition of their work in the form of recent carpet designs at the mu gallery in Eindhoven, Netherlands. The exhibition runs through October 26, 2014.

Visit the We Make Carpets website to check out more of their creations.

[via Colossal]